Chapter 5: Overcoming Obstacles

In Chapter 5 of Designing for Emotion written by Aarron Walter, he talked about overcoming obstacles. I love how he talks about how as designers, we have every tool to help our audience use their gut. We have all the tools for typography, contrast, color and more that lead our audience in the right direction. These tools not only help our reader use their gut, but it is easier for them to understand the information that we are throwing at them.

I never even thought about how appearance matters. Appearance is the difference between your audience trusting in your company, or not. I like how Walters uses a body guard in a pressed suit versus a guy in cutoff jean shorts and a ripped Grateful Dead shirt. This definitely put things into perception for me.

I disagree with what Dropbox did. I don’t think that bribery is ever the right thing to do. It is almost like trickery to me. I don’t support that especially since I know that as a user myself, I would not like to be bribed to stay on a site I don’t need to be staying on.

Originally posted at Claire White

Designing for Emotion – Chapter 5 (Overcoming Obstacles)

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This week my class had the option to read whatever chapter they wanted in Aaron  Walter’s book, Designing for Emotion, and I decided to continue where I last stopped at chapter 5. This chapter was all about overcoming obstacles that may occur when you are designing a site, app, etc. The major obstacle in most cases is trying to get people to trust in what you’re selling.  I totally agree with the author when he said that most of the things we do on a day-to-day basis is go with our gut. Gut decisions can be a good idea, but at some times it may not. I think you really have to pick and choose your battles.

One example used in this chapter was the website or app, Mint.

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Mint is a financial tracker that allows you to input information from whatever bank you are with and gives you tips on how to budget your money and even tracks your budget. I personally use this app on my iPhone one because my TFCU app kept crashing and I could never sign in and second because I heard how safe and reliable it was. I was a little skeptical at first because it said that you could sign up free all you needed to do was input all your bank information. Like the author said, trusting a website that says free with no gimmicks is incredibly tough. It helped that this site does have credible sources saying it’s a good app. Sources like the New York Times, Wall Street and I even saw that it’s a part of Intuit. The site and app also look very nice ad with me presence goes a long way so believing in this company wasn’t as hard as others are.

Another key point the author made was when he said that some companies will use bribery to get people coming to their site, but it’s not just about getting people to visit you site, it’s also about having them continue to visit and use the site. Dropbox was the example used and I think at first dropbox was something really cool, but overtime its lost it. I hate the fact that they tell you its free to sign up and you get to store things on a cloud, but they don’t tell you that you only get so  much storage, which isn’t a lot. I choose Google Drive over Dropbox now and do so because I feel like Google is more trustworthy, has a better reputation and is able to translate over a variety of devices easily.

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The last thing I took from this chapter was to continue trying if something doesn’t go as you thought. You have to continually try to make changes when you fail at something. Our gut thoughts are never always right and sometime we have to step back, ask others and go from there. Learning how to design doesn’t come overnight so it’s important to be open to change.

-Tori

Originally posted at Tori Beechum - PR Pubs